Shepler-Shipler
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201 Fairview Cemetery Shipler, Austin L (I152608)
 
202 Family trees submitted by Ancestry members. Source (S606855557)
 
203 From Barclay Bond Book: History of the Bond Family. Copied by Ruth A. Cox, Haviland, Kansas October 13, 1900. and supplied by R. Dean Warner Jan. 2000.
Barclay Bond, son of Samuel and Mary 9Harrold) Bond, was born 3-21-1836 in Wayne co., Ind. He was about 4 years old when his mother became partly insane and hung herself. She left 5 small children motherless, name, Isaac, Abijah, Barclay, Margaret and Mahlon. Barclay and his oldest brother was bound-out to a man by the name of Hawkins, they remained their until their father remarried. 1-13-1844 to Elizabeth Comer, widow of John comer. All except Mahlon, who lived with his grandmother, moved to Hamilton Co., Ind.
Barclay was married the 8th day, 12 month, 1859 to Sally Lancaster, daughter of Robert and Martha Lancaster. They settled near Carmel, Ind. and lived there until Sally died on 11th day, 3rd month, 1864. Barclay was left with 4 small children and had to hire them kept, he stayed in that county for about 2 years then with his children moved to Vermillion Co., Ill. Where on 31 day 3rd month, 1869 he married Elizabeth Thornton, daughter of Joshua Thornton.
In the fall of 1879 the family moved to Butler Co., Kansas. While there he practiced medicine some, seemed to have a gift in that direction but never had studied medicine, just came natural to him.
Barclay was sick a great deal himself, at times. Once while ill, he had Lung Fever, was thought by the Dr. to be in critical condition, two abcess came under his right arm yet he bore all with patience and was not heard to murmer in the least.Another time he had Erysipelas on his head and face, which went into his ears and at times he did not know what he was doing or saying. After he went to Kansas he seemed to have better health.
About 1891 the family moved to Cherokee Co., Kansas. He missed his married children, so he set a time for a reunion. There were 6 of them married at that time, 3 of them went; Albert, his wife Alice and children, Roy, Evertt, Clarence and Nallie. Mahlon, his wife Ora and children, Raymond, Mary, and Bessie. Ruth, her husband Alpheus and children, Alva, Dora, Melva and Nina. There were several of his friends and relatives met with them, all seemed to enjoy the day.
About 2 years before his death, he was thrown from a spring seat of a wagon bed to the ground, mashed his right hand, skined his face pretty bad and almost broke his neck. He and his son Samuel were taking a load of corn to town and in crossing the railroad tracks he was thrown out.
The last year of his life he made the remark, he would not have long to live and often made the remark, he would not be here long. Barclay Bond, died on the 1st day, 1st month, 1898, and was buried in the Friends Church yard at Riverton, Kansas.
 
Bond, Barclay (I050)
 
204 From DeAndrea Folster email of 06 Jun 2008 (in part)

"I had several sources that may indicate that Henry (b. C1719 )and John (b. C1720) father was Henry Shepler Sr. Books that had information in were "Men & Manors In the South Branch Valley"; Virginia Northern Neck Land Grants; Chronicles of Scotch-Irish Settlement in Va.; Hardy Co. West Va. Deeds Book 1 (Hardy Co. formed from Hanpshire Co. 1786) Chronicles of Scotch-Irish Settlement Vol. #3; 1782 census Hampshire Co. Val; Frederick Co. Wills 1807; Etc.
The Book that I found Abstracts of Virginia's Northern Neck Warrants and Surveys Frederick Co. 1747-1780 does list John Shepler of East Jersey. I am assuming that East Jersey was a place in Frederick Co. not the State of New Jersey because it goes on to say "he lives on Redbud Run and Opeckon near Winchester."
There is a record of a land transaction of Henry and John that referred to "Land My Father Henry Shipler dec'd formerly lived on "deed patent being date 21 April 1780 Lot 17 (to the sons) original survey 7 Aug. 1749.
"From Ray Albin: A map of John Shepler's land in Frederick County, Virginia showing 211 acres assigned from James Kennedy to John Shepler, surveyed in 1752. Adjoining land owners, WilliamAlbin, James Hagen and Hugh Farrell. William Albin's son William Bruce Albin married John Shepler's daughter Malinda Magdalene. 
Shepler, John (I1375)
 
205 From Find A Grave.com, 1-2011:
When James first came west he opened a photographic studio in Denver in 1872, about seven years before William Henry Jackson, who was his good friend. After a number of trips back to Pittsburgh, he came to Salt Lake City in 1890, staying first at the Valley House; then to Dan Loftus house, east on 3rd South; then to a large residence in the 21st Ward owned by a Mrs. Staines. Part of the house was occupied by Judge J. W. Powers. His first studio was two rooms adjoining the Kenyon Hotel, but when the Hooper Building was completed, February 1, 1891, he secured a studio there on the fifth floor. The building had been remodeled at his request to provide a large sky-light 20 feet long, which sloped toward the north to within three feet of the floor. Such a sky-light was essential to the early photographer to provide steady light. Exposures for photographs in those days always took from thirty seconds to three minutes, and a head rest was necessary to help the person being photographed to sit still.

Mr. Shipler went through the period from 1885 to 1895, when there came a revolution in photography, when the business switched from wet plates to dry plates. The wet plate, after exposure, had to be plunged immediately into a bath of silver nitrate and developed; but the later dry plates could be kept for some time before finishing. A later improvement came in changing from the old-time albumen covered paper, which could be easily over-exposed, to the modern type which is staple.

At that time newspapers objected to giving free advertising. They seldom published the name of the photographer with a portrait; but Mrs. Harry Shipler recalled that careful observation of the background and the lighting effects would usually reveal the gallery from whence the picture came. When distinguished guests came to the gallery, Shipler usually charged $2.50 to $3.00 a shot for photography, but he made a special rate of $2.00 to the newspapers if the publication would include his name when printing the picture.

In 1902, Harry Shipler withdrew from his father's establishment and went into business on his own. In 1910 he secured a room near the Tracy Loan and Trust Co. building, and started a side-line of photography, "for men only." When Auerbauch Company moved from Main Street, he obtained their old pattern department, a very long, narrow building, and conducted his business there.

Harry Shipler, his son Bill, assisted by a grandson W. Hollis, had a prosperous business, carrying a large commercial line and selling photographic supplies. 
Shipler, James William (I01)
 
206 From: gc-gateway@rootsweb.com, shepler@rootsweb.com
Subject: Re: [SHEPLER] Mary Shepler Eckstein - Frederick Co., VA,Westmoreland Co., PA
Date: Sat, 14 Jul 2007 22:57:17 -0000


This is a Message Board Post that is gatewayed to this mailing list.

Author: ellondon
Surnames:
Classification: queries

Message Board URL:

http://boards.rootsweb.com/surnames.shepler/249.1/mb.ashx

Message Board Post:

This is the first I've heard of Mary Shepler Eckstein but I am interested. I suspect you're probably right about her being related to the Westmoreland brothers, but I am curious about your comment that there were connection to Hampshire Co. Va. Could you explain those connections? Dawn 
Shepler, Mary Margaret (I139620)
 
207 From: gc-gateway@rootsweb.com, shepler@rootsweb.com
Subject: Re: [SHEPLER] Mary Shepler Eckstein - Frederick Co., VA,Westmoreland Co., PA
Date: Sun, 29 Jul 2007 15:20:30 -0000


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Author: gallienus
Surnames:
Classification: queries

Message Board URL:

http://boards.rootsweb.com/surnames.shepler/249.2.1.1.1.2.1.2.1.1.1.1/mb.ashx

Message Board Post:

Gene,

Henry Shepler who settled in Hampshire County, Va, by 1749 and John Shepler, who settled in the Opeckon settlement near Winchester, Frederick County, Virginia, were roughly contemporaries--I think. The earliest mention of John Shepler was in 1759. ""John Shepler of East Jersey, assignee of James Kennedy, no warrant, 211 acres whereon he lives on Red Bud & Opeckon near Winchester ... Surveyed ... 15 May 1759--Kennedy sold to Shepler ... " (Peggy Shomo Joyner, comp., Abstracts of Virginia's Northern Neck Warrants & Surveys, Frederick County, 1747-1780, v. 2 (1985), p. 140.) Assuming that he might have been about 30 when he obtained this land, he might have been born in the late 1720s. Henry Shepler, who settled on the South Potomac in Hampshire County, Virginia (now West Virginia) had his land surveyed (by George Washington) in 1749. He also might have been born also in the 1720s. Contemporaries--but nothing to my mind to suggest they were closely related. There are !
absolutely no officlal records--deeds, court cases, wills--to demonstrate any relationship.

The John and Henry Shepler mentioned in the will of Henry Shepler were his sons--presumably born in the 1750s or so. Both served in the Revolutionary War, and both, I believe, deserted. Son John Shepler apparently did move to German Township, Fayette County, Pa. and is listed there in the 1790 Census. However, I don't think it's his administration docket in Westmoreland County, Pa. in 1799. I feel that it is that of John Shepler, father of Peter and Matthias Shepler. It makes more sense to me that Peter and Matthias would administer their father's estate than the estate of their cousin--assuming that he was a cousin, which I don't think he was.

John Shepler of the Opeckon settlement, Frederick County, Virginia sold his land in 1783. I believe that he then moved to join his sons in Westmoreland County, Virginia. The household of John Shipler was enumerated in Rostraver Township, Westmoreland County, in 1790, separated from the other Shipler entries (for Peter, Mathias, M. John, P. John, Henry, and Philep). It is uncertain whether the earlier P. John Shipler is Philip's son John or Peter's son John, so it is possible that this John Shipler is the son of the "P." Shipler not earlier listed. It seems more likely to me, however, that this represents the elder John Shepler, father of Matthias, Philip, and Peter, after he had sold his land in Frederick County in 1783. The household consisted of one male over 16 and two females.

Letters of administration for the estate of John Shipler, deceased, were granted 19 February 1799 to Peter Shipler and Matthias Shipler, having given bond of 150. (Westmoreland County Administration Docket, Vol. A, p. 140.)
"Orphans Court Minutes, March 10, 1800. John Shipler Decd. Peter Shipler and Mathias Shipler Admins of said Deceased, exhibited their accounts personal estate 94.13.6 Disbursements including an allowance to the Admins for their trouble and expense of 4.10.0 is 46.3.9 Ballance after deducting expense of entry and Certificate one dollar and Seventy five centers is 47.16.8 to be distributed as the Law directs." (Westmoreland County Orphans Court Book A, p. 34
To my mind, nothing is strange about two unrelated families from different counties in Virginia settling near one another in southwestern Pennsylvania. This was a major migration route, over the mountains and down the Youghiogheny and Monogahela Rivers.

David
 
Shepler, John (I1375)
 
208 From: gc-gateway@rootsweb.com, shepler@rootsweb.com
Subject: [SHEPLER] Mary Shepler Eckstein - Frederick Co., VA,Westmoreland Co., PA
Date: Sat, 14 Jul 2007 18:14:47 -0000


This is a Message Board Post that is gatewayed to this mailing list.

Author: AndyLikins
Surnames: Shepler, Sheplar, Shipler, Eckstein, Eckstine, Extine
Classification: queries

Message Board URL:

http://boards.rootsweb.com/surnames.shepler/249/mb.ashx

Message Board Post:

I am trying to find more information on the family of Mary Shepler/Shipler/Sheplar (b. about 1730-40) who married Leonard Eckstein/Eckstine/Extine. One source says they were married in Frederick Co., Virginia, in 1760. In 1784 when they were living in Westmoreland Co., Pennsylvania, they were divorced by an act of the Pennsylvania Assembly. They also had connections to Hampshire Co., Virginia.

It seems likely that Mary would have been a sister of Peter, Philip and Mathias Shepler who also lived in Frederick Co., VA, and Westmoreland Co., PA.

I'd be glad to exchange information. 
Shepler, Mary Margaret (I139620)
 
209 Garrett Cemetery Covey, William Corban (I180540)
 
210 General Notes:
(From letter by Millie Golike Mar. 14, 1978) Chalkley was born on Grand Isle in the middle of Lake Champlain. It is part of the state of Vermont. He sat on the bank of the lake and watched thew Battle of Lake Champlain. He never forgot it although he was note quite 4 years old.
Mrs. Benton told me a story that was told to her by her great aunt Mary and cousin Henrietta. In 1865 Chalkley and his family were visiting Elizabeth Ann in Wabash Co., when Mary Ann Poff (Chalkley's wife) died suddenly. She probably had appendicitus. She (Mrs. Benton) doesn't know how long she was sick.
She doesn't know whether Chalkley tried to keep any of his family together or not, but Henrietta went to live with Frances, who was married to the Holloway. She (Henrietta) always said she went to live with the Holloway's when she was 8 and never left them as she married a Holloway.
Anyway, Elizabeth Ann took in the two youngest, Shelby and Monroe. Elizabeth Ann already had 5 boys and 1 girl, Mary, who was only 2, but I guess a few more didn't matter!
But Mary, spoiled from the day she was born, didn't know Shelby and Monroe weren't her brothers, so when Chalkley came and took them away, Mary was indignant to the point of hysteria. He had stolen her baby brothers and she cried for days!
Mary raised a family of all girls of which two are still living.

Another story: Our earliest Mosher ancestor in Rhode Island was so rich, he left all his grandsons, by the name of Mosher, 40 acres of land. Our ancestor got 80 acres because he was the oldest grandson. There were 16 or 18 of them!
The name 'Hoag' is not pronounced 'Hog', but is pronounced 'Hoy-ig'. The Hogg and Hoge families are mostly German and don't belong to us!

From Ancestry.com World Tree file 6-22-2000) death date of Chalkley is listed as October 2, 1890 - no location listed. 
Slyter, Chalkley (I117)
 
211 General notes:
Obituary: Published in the Grants Pass, Oregon 'The Courier' newspaper June 9, 1979. Entered into eternal rest Thursday, June 7, 1979
Eston Harold Shipler, 713 NE Eighth St., died Thursday at Southern Oregon General Hospital. He was born Jan. 28, 1911 in Raymond, Kan. and has lived in Grants Pass since 1956.
Mr. Shipler owned his own wood products manufacturing firm before retiring here.
He was married to Louisa Bond in Cherokee, Okla., on Nov. 27, 1930.
He and his wife moved to southern California where he worked in the aircraft industry during World War II. He belonged to Live Oak Grange in Rogue River, and was a member of Faith Baptist Church in Grants Pass.
Services will be Monday at 2pm in Slawson's Chapel of the Valley with Rev. Paul Donnelson officiating.
Donations may be made to the Faith Baptist Church memorial fund. Burial will be in Hawthorne Memorial Gardens.
Survivors include the widow; three sons, Dillard of Columbus, Ohio, Darrel of Minneapolis, and Michael, of Bay Minette, Ala.; a daughter, Virginia Degerman, of Spokane; two brothers, Clarence of Canyon City, Colo., and Curt of Silvia, Kan.; eight grandsons and three great granddaughters.
Friends may call at Slawson Funeral Home today and Sunday from 5 to 9pm.

A Narrative about my Dad by Michael Shipler April 2000:
My father was a big man...standing 6 foot and latter in life generally weighing around 225 pounds. He was large boned..the watch he wore covered the back of my wrist to the point that the band hung straight down at the sides.
He was a very emotional person, incredibly forgiving, very monogamist, very sexual and very non-violent. By todays standards, he was border line bipolar. As I grew up, you seldom saw him without a cigar, although he seldom drank. I only saw him drink a beer one time and he didn't finish that. He smoked cigars from his late teens until the late 50's, smoking 8 to 10 a day. Although rarely sick, he developed kidney stones about 1949 and had kidney stone problems off and on the rest of his life. During the early 60's he developed gout and in those days, they tried controlling things by diet as medications were limited, even if diet had nothing to do with the problem. The diet for each problem opposed the other. One of Dad's favorite breakfasts was salt pork and eggs and he always put bacon grease on his popcorn which he eat often, which I'm sure ultimately caused his heart problems. He had 5 major heat attacks, the last one in April before his death in June. After the last attack, the doctors determined that he only had one spot (about the size of a silver dollar) on his left ventricle that wasn't scar tissue.
Our house was always 'Grand Central Station', with my folks friends and friends of mine and my siblings always stopping by for a visit or to play cards or have dinner with us. And that continued even after all the kids left home. Dad never met a stranger..he loved people and loved to talk (his long distance phone bill would run $200 even during the 1950's). Although he only had an eighth grade education, he could talk on most any subject. And had a very inventive mind. Most of his life was spent in some type of business that allowed him to meet people. Sales was his true game. I remember one time that I traveled with him while I was in High School, he was in the speciality advertising business at the time, we stopped in front of a small country store in Northern California...Dad leaned over the back seat where all his samples were and selected two items. I asked if he was going to take more items or his catalogs in with him and he said no, this guy will purchase one of these two items..and sure enough about an hour later, out he came with an order.
He worked math in his head faster than I could with a calculator. And he was near genius with things electrical (even electronic) or mechanical. When he met Mom at about age 19, he was Shop foreman for the Ford Motor Company in the town of Haviland, Kansas. I can still see him sitting on the floor of the living room with our first color TV literally scattered about the room so he could figure out how it worked and then to fine tune it for best image..it really did work better when he finished! His one true 'fault' was that he lost interest in things once all problems were resolved.
Dad loved automobiles..he always drove a fairly new one and was always tinkering with them and always wore a white dress shirt when he did. How he did that without getting grease all over it was amazing to me. His shirts were always done by a commercial laundry with heavy starch. They almost broke when he took them from the package. He had a 1949 Pontiac station wagon with the real wood trim on the sides and to show you how 'state of the art' he was, he installed propane as the primary fuel source with a switch over for gasoline. It worked beautifully, not bad for 1949!
His relationship with his children was interesting. He seemed to have little use for children under the age of puberty, but just the same, we always had family day on Sunday's. Usually based around driving somewhere for a picnic or sometimes just driving. A better driver, I've never met. Dad loved the open road! After the war years in the aircraft industry, most of Dad's life was spent working as a sales rep or working for himself, selling on the road. During my informative years, he was on the road during the week, arriving home Friday night, Saturday with Mom or Mom and the family around the house and Sundays driving with the family. Dad always seemed to have a special affinity for my brother Del, I think mostly for his success without education, I think he saw himself in Del. And of course, Gin, my only sister could do no wrong in Dad's eyes. He loved her like no other. Dad seemed equally proud of my oldest brother Dill, both for his education and his going his seperate way in life. After all my siblings left home, I grew very close to my father. To the degree that at times from late high school on, we were more like close friends then father and son. I had the best of both worlds, close family early..'only child' through high school. I had a great childhood with much love!
After the death of his brother Orville, things seemed to change for Dad and he left his family home in Kansas, not long after. Other than his brother Clarence in Colorado, the rest of his family stayed in Kansas and apparently as a result of his moving away, his family had little to do with him. He wasn't even notified of his mothers death until long afterward. I do remember visiting Uncle Clarence in Colorado a couple of times and Uncle Bill visited Dad in Oregon once in the early 70's. Other than that, he did not have contact with his home folks until the 1970's, and then only one or two visits back to Kansas. He made his own life and believed in it! He was however, always intrigued by the oral family histories of the Shipler families and pursued them when possible, becoming good friends with the Shipler clan in Utah and visiting Guy Emory Shipler (listed in Who's Who in America) in New York. Was never able to tie the Shipler families together. Many of Dad's personal friendships lasted his entire life.
His love for Mom was something to behold. He saw her waking by the Ford shop in Kansas, one day and literally fell in love with her at first sight. Even with their mutual strong wills, their love endured. Before his death, Dad asked a close friend who was Morman, to 'seal' their marriage for them after their passing. This was done with my approval and I'm sure that they are together to this day! 
Shipler, Eston Harold (I041)
 
212 General Notes: Edward moved from North Carolina abt. 1828-1830 and settled near Indianapolis, Indiana (notes from Richard Dolan 2-2000) Hobson, Edward (I068)
 
213 General: James was raised by Samuel Carr
Moved to Kansas in 1873 
Shipler, James Elliott (I048)
 
214 He died between the 1910 and 1920 Federal Censuses. Shepler, Dr Joseph Taylor (I170981)
 
215 He was born Abt. 1720 in what is now Germany.
Magdalen (a) is the daughter of Unknown and Unknown. She was born in Germany.
Notes for Magdalen (a):
General Notes:
Surname also Shiplor or Shipler and Schepler.
Undocumented arrival to the colonies has been placed as 1755, this may be the wrong date as a deed from Lord Fairfax to John Shepler for his land in Frederick Co., VA was dated in 1752.
His will was documented in Westmoreland Co., PA in 1799.
Sons Mathias and Peter named as Executors.
From DeAndrea Folster email of 06 Jun 2008 (in part)
"I had several sources that may indicate that Henry (b. C1719 )and John (b. C1720) father was Henry Shepler Sr. Books that had information in were "Men & Manors In the South Branch Valley"; Virginia Northern Neck Land Grants; Chronicles of Scotch-Irish Settlement in Va.; Hardy Co. West Va. Deeds Book 1 (Hardy Co. formed from Hanpshire Co. 1786) Chronicles of Scotch-Irish Settlement Vol. #3; 1782 census Hampshire Co. Val; Frederick Co. Wills 1807; Etc.
The Book that I found Abstracts of Virginia's Northern Neck Warrants and Surveys Frederick Co. 1747-1780 does list John Shepler of East Jersey. I am assuming that East Jersey was a place in Frederick Co. not the State of New Jersey because it goes on to say "he lives on Redbud Run and Opeckon near Winchester."
There is a record of a land transaction of Henry and John that referred to "Land My Father Henry Shipler dec'd formerly lived on "deed patent being date 21 April 1780 Lot 17 (to the sons) original survey 7 Aug. 1749."
From Ray Albin: A map of John Shepler's land in Frederick County, Virginia showing 211 acres assigned from James Kennedy to John Shepler, surveyed in 1752. Adjoining land owners, William Albin, James Hagen and Hugh Farrell. William Albin's son William Bruce Albin married John Shepler's daughter Malinda Magdalene.
From Ray Albin two items:
(1) Deed from Lord Fairfax to John Shepler.
(2) Survey map of John Shepler's land in Frederick Co., VA living next to William Albin Sr.

John Shepler and Magdalen (a). They had 6 children.
i. Mary Margaret Shepler . She was born Bet. 1735–1740 in Germany. She married Leonard Eckstein. They were married 1760 in Virginia.
ii. Mathias Shepler . He was born Abt. 1740 in Rhenesh Palatinate, Germany. He died on 25 Apr 1822 in Rostraver Township, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania.
iii. Jane (Nancy Jane) aka Agnes Shepler . She was born Abt. 1744 in probablyGermany. She married John Corwin. They were married Abt. 1773 in Probably Westmoreland Co., Pennsylvania. She died Aft. 1820 in Rostraver Township, Westmoreland Co., Pennsylvania.
iv. Philip Shepler . He was born Abt. 1741 in Rhenesh Palatinate, Germany. He died on 22 May 1829 in Rostraver Township, Westmoreland Co., Pennsylvania.
v. Peter Shepler . He was born Abt. 1742 in Rhenesh Palatinate, Germany.
7vi. Malinda Magdalene Shepler . She was born Abt. 1746 in Germany?. She died Abt. 1816 in Kentucky. 
Shepler, John (I1375)
 
216 He was born Abt. 1720 in what is now Germany.
Magdalen (a) is the daughter of Unknown and Unknown. She was born in Germany.
Notes for Magdalen (a):
General Notes:
Surname also Shiplor or Shipler and Schepler.
Undocumented arrival to the colonies has been placed as 1755, this may be the wrong date as a deed from Lord Fairfax to John Shepler for his land in Frederick Co., VA was dated in 1752.
His will was documented in Westmoreland Co., PA in 1799.
Sons Mathias and Peter named as Executors.
From DeAndrea Folster email of 06 Jun 2008 (in part)
"I had several sources that may indicate that Henry (b. C1719 )and John (b. C1720) father was Henry Shepler Sr. Books that had information in were "Men & Manors In the South Branch Valley"; Virginia Northern Neck Land Grants; Chronicles of Scotch-Irish Settlement in Va.; Hardy Co. West Va. Deeds Book 1 (Hardy Co. formed from Hanpshire Co. 1786) Chronicles of Scotch-Irish Settlement Vol. #3; 1782 census Hampshire Co. Val; Frederick Co. Wills 1807; Etc.
The Book that I found Abstracts of Virginia's Northern Neck Warrants and Surveys Frederick Co. 1747-1780 does list John Shepler of East Jersey. I am assuming that East Jersey was a place in Frederick Co. not the State of New Jersey because it goes on to say "he lives on Redbud Run and Opeckon near Winchester."
There is a record of a land transaction of Henry and John that referred to "Land My Father Henry Shipler dec'd formerly lived on "deed patent being date 21 April 1780 Lot 17 (to the sons) original survey 7 Aug. 1749."
From Ray Albin: A map of John Shepler's land in Frederick County, Virginia showing 211 acres assigned from James Kennedy to John Shepler, surveyed in 1752. Adjoining land owners, William Albin, James Hagen and Hugh Farrell. William Albin's son William Bruce Albin married John Shepler's daughter Malinda Magdalene.
From Ray Albin two items:
(1) Deed from Lord Fairfax to John Shepler.
(2) Survey map of John Shepler's land in Frederick Co., VA living next to William Albin Sr.

John Shepler and Magdalen (a). They had 6 children.
i. Mary Margaret Shepler . She was born Bet. 1735–1740 in Germany. She married Leonard Eckstein. They were married 1760 in Virginia.
ii. Mathias Shepler . He was born Abt. 1740 in Rhenesh Palatinate, Germany. He died on 25 Apr 1822 in Rostraver Township, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania.
iii. Jane (Nancy Jane) aka Agnes Shepler . She was born Abt. 1744 in probablyGermany. She married John Corwin. They were married Abt. 1773 in Probably Westmoreland Co., Pennsylvania. She died Aft. 1820 in Rostraver Township, Westmoreland Co., Pennsylvania.
iv. Philip Shepler . He was born Abt. 1741 in Rhenesh Palatinate, Germany. He died on 22 May 1829 in Rostraver Township, Westmoreland Co., Pennsylvania.
v. Peter Shepler . He was born Abt. 1742 in Rhenesh Palatinate, Germany.
7vi. Malinda Magdalene Shepler . She was born Abt. 1746 in Germany?. She died Abt. 1816 in Kentucky. 
Shepler, John (I1375)
 
217 Heart Burgettstown, Fairview Cemetery Washington Co, PA Shepler, Catherine (I155726)
 
218 His death date was between 1794 and 1796.. he married Malinda Shepler in Frederick Co., Va. some time between 1761 and 1763. Malinda was born 1752 in Winchester,Virginia and she died before May 10, 1816 in Nelson, Kentucky. William served as an Ensign in the Revolutinary War with the rangers of the Frontier from Westmoreland Co., PA.
The name of the cemetery where he is said to be buried no longer exists, so I am putting him in this virtual cemetery so he could be connected to his family and not forgotten.
Their children were:
Mary Elizabeth 23 Mar 1774 died 1800
Elizabeth 1776
Isaac 1778
Absolum 1780
Sarah 1782
Phillip C. 1784
Joshua Carman 5 Aug 1794

The children below are already in findagrave so they are not shown above. 
Albin, William Bruce Jr (I186515)
 
219 https://familysearch.org/tree/person/9CD4-MYZ/details Shipler, William Hollis (I139368)
 
220 https://familysearch.org/tree/person/9CD4-MYZ/details Shipler, William Hollis (I139368)
 
221 i. MARY MARGARET SHEPLER, b. Bet. 1735 to 1745, Germany?
ii. MATHIAS SHEPLER, b. Abt. 1740, Rhenesh Palatinate, Germany; d. 25 Apr 1822, Rostraver, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania.
iii. JANE (NANCY JANE) AKA AGNES SHEPLER, b. Bet. 1740 to 1755, probably Germany; d. 1810, Rostraver, Westmoreland, Pennsylvania.
iv. PHILLIP SHEPLER, b. Abt. 1741, Rhenesh Palatinate, Germany; d. 22 May 1829, Rostraver, Westmoreland, Pennsylvania
v. PETER SHEPLER, b. Abt. 1742, Rhenesh Palatinate, Germany.
vi. MALINDA MAGDALENE SHEPLER, b. Abt. 1746, Germany?; d. 1816, Kentucky. 
Family F62829
 
222 In the 1880 census, someone in household of her daughter. Catharine Eliza (Hunter) Wheeler, listed her mother's [meaning Margaret Holman's] birthplace as VA. Note: So perhaps she was born near southern PA/northern VA line? Holman, Margaret (I175860)
 
223 Information from Findagrave.com Memorials # 164733 and #164747:
In 1902, Harry Shipler withdrew from his father's establishment and went into business on his own. In 1910 he secured a room near the Tracy Loan and Trust Co. building, and started a side-line of photography, "for men only." When Auerbauch Company moved from Main Street, he obtained their old pattern department, a very long, narrow building, and conducted his business there.

Harry Shipler, his son Bill, assisted by a grandson W. Hollis, had a prosperous business, carrying a large commercial line and selling photographic supplies.

Not content to be a portrait photographer, Harry Shipler developed into one of Utah's earliest news photographers. He supplied photographs to local newspapers, whose artists made line drawings for publication. At one time Harry supplied photographs to five Utah newspapers. One of his most talked about exploits was the documentation of Park City, Utah, a mining community thirty miles east of Salt Lake City, after it burned in 1898. When Harry learned of the fire, he attached his camera to his bicycle and eight hours later arrived in Park City-no small feat since it was all uphill on dirt roads-where he documented the destroyed town. His professional motto was: "I go anywhere to photograph anything."

As the newspapers learned to make halftones, Shipler was in even greater demand. He traveled around the Intermountain West taking pictures for a wide variety of clients. He documented an avalanche at the Highland Boy mine, Utah's first automobile accidents, the telegraphers' union walkout as well as other labor strikes, construction of Utah's Capitol building, installation of Salt Lake City's transit system, and the Wright Brothers visit to Utah. He also took early photographs of Yellowstone National Park.

Fascinated by automobiles Harry purchased his first car around 1905. He loved to travel over Utah's wagon trails in his high-clearance vehicle; once he and a friend drove from Salt Lake City to the Grand Canyon in an open roadster in one day. They distributed that day's edition of the along the way to dramatize the event. Often these early jaunts were documented with photographs. Harry and his wife often traveled to Saltair resort to capture sunsets on the Great Salt Lake. Harry retired from active involvement in the studio in 1960.

When Harry Shipler passed away in 1961 he was eulogized in the Salt Lake Tribune:

Harry Shipler probably knew as much about photography as anyone in this state-or a dozen states, for that matter-for he was a pioneer in the art. The principles of photography had, of course, been discovered before he was born, but he was taking excellent pictures long before such refinements as light meters or fast film was available. 
Shipler, Harry (I05)
 
224 Iowa Center, Iowa Gamble, Dean (I159533)
 
225 ISAAC H. SHEPLER, one of the representative citizens of Belle Vernon, Rostraver township, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, was born in the above mentioned township, March 20, 1840, a son of Captain Joseph and Mary (Blackburn) Shepler, and a descendant on both the paternal and maternal sides of natives of Germany who settled in Virginia, in the vicinity of Winchester.
Matthias Shepler, an early ancestor of Isaac H. Shepler, with two brothers, Peter and Philip, moved from Virginia before the war of the Revolution and settled in Rostraver township, Pennsylvania, taking up farms on the Monongahela hills. He married Margaret Houseman, whose family was one of the early settlers of the township, and their children were: John, Philip, Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Mary, Margaret and Catherine. All were married and raised families, and their descendants are numerous in this section of the state.

Isaac Shepler, fourth son of Matthias and Margaret (Houseman) Shepler, was born in Rostraver township, Westmoreland county. He married Sarah Hill, daughter of Joseph and Mary Hill, and their children were as follows: Joseph, mentioned hereafter: Lewis. died December, 1881 : Mary, deceased, was the wife of James Wright; Samuel; Margaret, died at the age of eighteen; Elizabeth, deceased, was the wife of Davis Shepler: Sarah E., became the wife of John Stephens. Isaac Shepler (father) died December 10, 1837: his wife died July, 1869, aged eighty-seven years. Both are buried at Fell's Church. Joseph Hill, father of Sarah (Hill) Shepler, at the age of eighteen came to Rostraver township, several years before the Braddock expedition, the first white settler of the township.

Joseph Shepler, eldest son of Isaac and Sarah (Hill) Shepler. was born in Rostraver township, Westmoreland county, March 6, 1807. He received his education in the district schools of the town, and to the age of twenty-two lived on the homestead farm. The year following his marriage he moved on one of his father's farms, which he conducted for eight years. In 1836 he located three hundred and sixty acres in Putnam county, Ohio, with the intention of moving there, but on account of the death of his father was persuaded by his mother to remain in Rostraver. In 1838 he located on the farm which he thereafter made his home. At the age of twenty-one he was chosen captain of the First Company, Eighty-eighth State Volunteers, which position he held for eight years; was captain of the Monongahela Blues five years, and first lieutenant of the Rostraver Cavalry seven years. He filled most of the offices of the town, having been elected to the same on the Democratic ticket. For almost half a century he was a member. of Fell's Methodist Episcopal Church, and one of its staunchest supporters. He married, April 16, 1829, Mary Blackburn, born in Rostraver, March 28, 1807, daughter of Joseph and Nancy Blackburn. Their children were: Sarah, born January 7, 1830, became the wife of William Jones, farmer and banker, residing in Rostraver township. Violet, born August 20, 1833, became the wife of Captain Martin Coulson, a resident of Allegheny City. John B., born February i8, 1835, married Josephine Claywell, of Illinois. Isaac Hill, born March 20, 1840, mentioned hereafter.

Isaac Hill Shepler was reared at home and acquired his education in the common schools and Ames Commercial School in Syracuse, New York, graduating from the latter institution, June 4. 1866. After his marriage he rented and farmed the adjoining farm to the homestead in connection with working with his father on the home farm, and four Years later he removed to the farm owned by his brother-in-law in Webster, consisting of two hundred and seventy acres, which he conducted for four years, also assisting in the management of the home farm. During the last year of this period he received a severe sunstroke, which incapacitated him for work for one `-ear. during which time he resided near Fell's Church. in Rostraver township. He then went west and for two Years was employed on the Coulson mercantile boats which had extensive government contracts through North and South Dakota, Nebraska and Montana. In 1881 he returned to Westmoreland county, locating on the Caldwell property in Rostraver township, where he farmed for two years. He then purchased one-quarter interest in the Belle Vernon Saw and Planing Mill Companv, and for four years served in the capacity of bookkeeper, contractor and buyer. At the expiration of this time Grover Cleveland was elected to the presidency, and Mr. Shepler was offered and accepted a position as gauger, serving four years and one month. For a period of eight months under Andrew Johnson's administration he served as storekeeper. In 1890 he purchased the mercantile business of P. Rider & Company in Belle Vernon, and five Years later, upon the expiration of his lease, built a business building on his home property on the hill where he has since been engaged in mercantile pursuits. During his residence in Belle Vernon he'has served on the school board, as borough assessor, and has been president of the board of health, and previous to that time he served as school director, township assessor and a member of the election board. He was formerly a Methodist in religion, but is now a member of the Presbyterian church, and for forty years has been a member of the choir. Since 1862 he has been actively identified with Gummert Lodge, No. 252. Free and Accepted Masons, at Fayette City, Pennsylvania: he is a master Mason. Mr. Shepler married, December 28, 180. Evaline S. Shepler. daughter of Samuel Shepler. of Rostraver township, and their children are: James Kerr, born December 2. 1872. a glass gatherer: Mary B., born September 3, 1874, widow of Fred. Jeffries, resides at home: 'William Jones. born August 8. 1876, a glass gatherer; and Elizabeth C., born August 19, 1883. resides at home.  
Shepler, Isaac Hill (I180826)
 
226 Jonathan William and Sara were received at the Miami MM, Ohio, January 1, 1807. (Hinshaw's Encyclopedia of Amercian Quaker Genealogy, Vol 1, pg 73) Hobson, Jonathan William (I072)
 
227 Leonard Eckstein claimed in his will daughters Catherine and Nancy were not his.
From Catherine's stone in the Rehoboth Cemetery, Rostraver Twp., PA, her year of birth was 1772. From Andy Likins information on the Eckstein, Shepler and Case families, Leonard published in 1774 in Virginia his wife's debts were not his and he waited 10 years before divorcing Catherine's mother in Pennsylvania.
From Janice Patterson Rosenthal 02 Nov 2008
I forgot to share with you a very interesting find about Leonard Eckstein. I found his naturalization in Philadelphia. And it seems he might have been a QUAKER.
PA Archives, 2nd Series, Vol. 2, p. 418:
“And at the same Court * the following persons, BEING QUAKERS, or such who conscientiously scruple to take an oath, being also Foreigners, and having complied with the Terms required by the aforesaid act of Parliament, took and subscribed the Qualifications for them appointed by the same act of Parliament, etc.:
Leonard Eckstine of Philadelphia was naturalized *see p. 408: This court was “a Supreme Court held at Philadelphia, before William Allen and William Coleman, Esquires, Judges of the said Court, the tenth and eleventh days of April, in the Year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and sixty-one, between the Hours of Nine and twelve of the Clock in the forenoon of the same day…
But wait--there's more. I was doing some research for a Patterson lady a while back and it led me into Quaker records. The following stuck in my mind and I recalled it as I began to research Morris Co., NJ families who ended up in Rostraver: From "Hopewell [Monthly Meeting in Frederick Co., VA] Friends History 1734-1934" by John W. Wayland (Heritage Books, 1998), p. 103:
“The next year, 1779, was notable at Hopewell for visitors. Among the Friends who came from a distance were George Dillwyn and BENJAMIN REEVES from New Jersey, John Simpson from Pennsylvania, Margaret Sidwell from Maryland, and Abel Thomas and Samuel Hug
I've been intensely studying Reeves the past few months, and can't for the life of me think of who this Benjamin Reeves could be if he is not Benjamin Reeve(s) born abt. 1743/44--Abner's brother!
I know I'm jumping all over the place, but I thought this last thing I found would amuse you:
The Statues at Large of Pennsylvania from 1682-1801 compiled by James T. Mitchell, et al, p. 279
“Chapter MLXXXIII - An Act to Dissolve the Marriage of Leonard Eckstine of the County of Westmoreland, and Mary, His Wife. (Section I, P.L.) Whereas Leonard Eckstine of the county of Westmoreland, farmer, hath presented a petition to this house setting forth that Mary his wife, late Mary Shipler, had been unfaithful to his bed, and had committed adultery with divers persons; and praying for leave to bring in a bill for the dissolution of his marriage with her:
And whereas it appears to this house, by the report of their committee appointed to inquire into the truth of the charges alleged in the petition of the said Leonard Eckstine, that the said Mary hath not only been guilty of repeated acts of adultery, but hath eloped from the bed and board of the said Leonard Eckstine and lived in open and avowed prostitution for several years.
And whereas this house did on the twenty-ninth day of November last give leave to the said Leonard Eckstine to bring in a bill agreeable to the prayer of his petition he giving notice thereof at least six weeks in one or more of the newspapers printed in this city and it hath been proved to this house that notice hath been given accordingly;
Therefore:
[Section I.] (Section II, P.L.) Be it enacted and it is hereby enacted by the Representatives of the Freemen of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in General Assembly met, and by the authority of the same, That the marriage of the said Leonard Eckstine with the said Mary be, and the same is hereby declared to be dissolved and annulled to all intents, constructions and purposes whatsoever; and the said Leonard Eckstine and the said Mary shall be and they are hereby declared respectively to be separated, set free and totally discharged from their matrimonial contract, and from all duties and obligations to each other as husband and wife, as fully, effectually and absolutely to all intents and purposes, as if they never had been joined in matrimony, or by any other contract whatever, any law, usage or custom to the contrary thereof in anywise nothwithstanding. Passed March 22, 1784. Recor
Mary/Magdalena Shepler seems to have been a saucy wench! Not the kind of info to be found in"The Eckstein Family," for sure!
That's all for now...

Janice 
Eckstein, Leonard (I173401)
 
228 Martin and his wife, Violet G Shepler, lived with Capt Joseph Shepler for a number of years. Capt Shepler was a riverboat captain and in later census reports, Martin was also a riverboat captain and his son, Joseph, certainly named after Capt Joseph Shepler, also worked on a riverboat. Coulson, Martin (I182684)
 
229 MARY MARGARET2 SHEPLER (JOHN1) was born Bet. 1735 to 1745 in Germany?. She married (1) LEONARD ECKSTEIN/EXTINE. She married (2) LEONARD ECKSTEIN 1760 in Virginia, son of CONRAD ECKSTEIN and ANNA KORNKEIN. He was born 17 Sep 1731 in near Nuremburg, Germany, and died 1800 in Frankfort, Virginia(now Frankfort West Virginia.
More About MARY MARGARET SHEPLER:
Date born 2: Bet. 1735 to 1745
Notes for LEONARD ECKSTEIN:
Leonard Eckstein claimed in his will daughters Catherine and Nancy were not his.
From Catherine's stone in the Rehoboth Cemetery, Rostraver Twp., PA, her year of birth was 1772. From Andy Likins information on the Eckstein, Shepler and Case families, Leonard published in 1774 in Virginia his wife's debits were not his and he waited 10 years before divorcing Catherine's mother in Pennsylvania.
More About LEONARD ECKSTEIN and MARY SHEPLER:
Marriage: 1760, Virginia
Children of MARY SHEPLER and LEONARD ECKSTEIN are:
i. MARGARET ECKSTEIN, b. Abt. 1763, Frederick Co., Virginia; d. 1847; m. PETER STIPE.
ii. MARY ECKSTEIN, b. Abt. 1766, Frederick Co., Virginia; d. Aft. 1824; m. JONAS JR. LIKINS.
iii. ELIZABETH ECKSTEIN, m. PATERICK ALEXANDER.
iv. ROSANNA ECKSTEIN, m. DANIEL JONES.
v. NANCY ECKSTEIN, b. Abt. 1774; d. 1839, Logan Co., KY.

Descendants of Leonard5 Smock, Abraham7 Smock, Samuel8 Smock, Jacob Issac10 Smock,
Ancestors of Leonard5 Smock and Descendants of John1 Shepler. No living dates.
110 of 215
Children of MARY SHEPLER and LEONARD ECKSTEIN are:
8. vi. MAGDALENE3 ECKSTEIN, b. 1761, Frederick Co., Virginia; d. 1832.
9. vii. ELISABETH ECKSTEIN, b. Abt. 1767, Frederick Co., Virginia; d. Abt. 1802, Allegheny Co., Maryland.
viii. ROSANNA ECKSTEIN, b. Frederick Co., Virginia.
10. ix. CATHERINE ECKSTEIN/EXTINE, b. 1772, ; d. 03 Nov 1836, Rostraver Township, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania.
x. NANCY ECKSTEIN, m. FREDERICK HISE. 
Family F74300
 
230 Mary wrote a series of poemsin 1866-67 that have been passed down. In May of 2000, this series of poems was published in booklet form under her original title 'Heart Throbs' by her Great Grand Son Michael D. Shipler. Hobson, Mary C. (I053)
 
231 Memorial Lawn Cemetery Potts, Laura Francis (I11498)
 
232 Memorial Lawn Cemetery Shipler, Wilson Maturin (I141941)
 
233 Memorial Lawn Cemetery Shipler, Wilson Maturin (I141941)
 
234 Memorial Lawn Cemetery Potts, Laura Francis (I11498)
 
235 North Carolina County Registers of Deeds. Microfilm. Record Group 048. North Carolina State Archives, Raleigh, NC. Source (S2617568074)
 
236 Note: Westmoreland Co, PA had been formed in 1773 from Bedford Co, PA. Note: Her name is spelled Shepler, Catherine (I150841)
 
237 Now West Virginia Eckstein, Leonard (I173401)
 
238 Obituary from Coeta Bond Green:
Mrs. Ora A. Bond formally of Wichita, Kansas, passed away at the home of her daughter Mrs. Gladys M. Chase 1331 N. Ppolar, April 29th, 1938. After residing the past year at Hawthorne, California, she came here Feb. 7th on a visit. She was a member of the Mother Church of Christ Scientist, Boston, Mass., for 40 years and affiliated with the First Church Scientists, Wichita, Kansas. She was born near Pleasant Plain, Iowa, August 8, 1868. When she was but a small child the family came to Kansas, where her father and mother held circuits in Methodist Protestant Church, both being ordained ministers and faithfully performed their duties through their remaining years. Shortly after her mother's death in 1885, she married to James A. Miller. She was married to Mahlon Dainel Bond in 1889. To this union were 8 children born.
Mrs. Mae Taber of Shenandoah, Iowa
Nellie Melva Bond (deceased)
Mrs. Bessie R. Warner of Wichita, Kansas
Mr. Barkley M. Bond of Emporia, Kansas
Mrs. Lillian L. Gause of Hawthorne, California
Mr. Eddy L. Bond of Langdon, Kansas
Mrs. Gladys M. Chase of Wichita, Kansas
Mrs. Louisa Shipler of Hawthorne, California
She leaves one brother, Luther E. Johnson of Ainswarth, Iowa. One sister, Mrs. Lida Cloud of Wichita, Kansas, 26 grandchildren and 13 great-grandchildren. She was married each time by her father, Rev. Addison Johnson. Funeral services were held at Lahey-Martin Mortuary of Wichita, Kansas, April 30th, 1938, and laid beside her parents in the Pleasant Hill Cemetery near Rose Hill, Kansas.

Recolections by Coeta Green (July 2, 1990):
About her last days, how sweet she was thru her misery and how Betty and I would comb her hair. One on each side. She had congestive heart failure and because she was Christian Scientist, wouldn't let them call a doctor.

Recollections by Coeta Green (July 15, 1992):
Being Christian Scientist, she wouldn't let a doctor be called. Readers from the church came out to read to her and pray. When she got so bad she sat in her rocking chair with her head on a pillow at the dining room table. Food odors bothered her so Dad hung blankets on each side of the door to the kitchen to help keep the odors out.
Another memory I have is og Grandma and her sister Lida at our house in the summer time, sitting on a blanket in the yard with Mom and I, singing in harmony. Lida sang melody, Grandma second and mom tenor. They sang 'Frog went a courtin'', 'Billy boy', 'Old Black Joe' to name a few. Of course, I think any time any of the Bond's got together there was singing. 
Johnson, Ora Annette (I044)
 
239 Obituary: Written by her son Michael D. Shipler
Mrs. Louisa Bond Shipler of Grants Pass, Oregon, passed away in her sleep at the home of her youngest son, Michael D. Shipler, 602 Hutchison Ave., Bay Minette, Alabama, Friday, May 3, 1985. She began a visit to her son, E. Darrel Shipler in Indianapolis, Indiana, on March 28 and arrived in Alabama May 1st.
She was a member of the Faith Baptist Church in Grants Pass and had been raised in childhood in the Quaker and Christian Science faiths.
She was born Laura Louisa Bond, in the home of her parents, Mahlon D. and Ora A. Bond, near Haviland, Kansas, November 27, 1909. She was the youngest of eight children born to this union. She graduated from high school in Haviland, and went on to graduate from Emporia College, Emporia, Kansas.
While teaching in Kansas, she met and married her beloved 'Ship', Eston H. Shipler in Cherokee, Oklahoma, November 26, 1930. Four children were raised in their love, Dillard Bond Shipler, of Aiken, South Carolina; Virginia Shipler Hapeman, of Idyllwild, California; Eston Darrel Shipler, of Indianapolis, Indiana; and Michael Don Shipler, of Bay Minette, Alabama. Her beloved husband preceded her to God's hands June 7, 1979.
She leaves two brothers, Barclay M. Bond, of Wichita, Kansas; Eddy L. Bond, of Wichita, Kansas; one sister, Lillian L. Gause, of Modesto, California; her four children; eight grandchildren; six great grandchildren.
Funeral services are to be held at Slawson's Chapel of the Valley in Grants Pass, Wednesday, May 8, at 10 AM> She will be laid to rest beside her husband in Hawthorne Memorial Gardens. Visitation will be Tuesday evening and prior to the services. A Memorial Fund has been established at Faith Baptist Church, 3405 Williams Hwy., Grants Pass, Oregon.

Medical data (written by Michael Shipler within 48 hours of her passing):
5/2/1985 she appeared and stated that she was in good health. Approximate time of passing 10 AM May 3, 1985. Long history of high blood pressure. Had flu virus approx 1 1/2 weeks prior for less than 2 days. Had minor fall on wrist and side approx 30 days prior to passing - taken by Darrel to med center, had x-rays and full physical - no broken bones, only minor bruises, blood pressure OK, in good health, some fluid in lungs resulting from reaction to blood pressure medication within the last couple of months, all doctors aware and situation under control.
Passed in her sleep with no apparent trauma, did not loose consciousness and no indication of pain.
Went to bed approx midnight, was heard lightly snoring around 1 AM, her room door was closed when she went to bed, but was ajar around 7AM, indicating that she had been up to visit the bathroom during the night, which was her usual routine. She was discovered by Pam Shipler approx noon, May 3, 1985. A Paramedic crew was called within 20 minutes. The coroner was Hughy Mack of Balwin County, Alabama, #205-947-7781. Death certificate lists 'natural causes', no autopsy was called for, either by the coroner or the surviving children.

A narrative by Michael Shipler, July 18, 2000:
My mother, Laura Louisa Bond, changed her name at the time of her marriage to Louisa Bond Shipler and went by 'Lou'. She was raised Quaker and Christian Scientist, with conversion to Baptist in the mid 1950's. As a graduate of Emporia College, Emporia, Kansas, Louisa (pronounced Lou-eye-za) as she was known by her family, she became a school teacher. In those days a teacher had to be single. During the first year of her marriage to Eston, they were secretly married, each living with their parents so that she could keep teaching. After that, Dad, being of the 'old school' took over as the 'bread winner' and Mom did not work again until about 1946, when she worked for about a year as a waitress at the Cozy Corner Cafe in Grants Pass, Oregon. Not one of my father's big thrills. We moved to Klamath Falls, Oregon, about 1947, and again she did not work at the request of Dad. However, about the time I started school in 1949, Dad had a kidney stone attack and was in the hospital and Mom took advantage of the situation and went to work for a local drug store, much to Dad's chagrin. Things were not good around the Shipler household for some time, in fact they were never the same again, as Mom continued working for drug stores until her retirement at age 62. Dad never really got over her pressing her authority. Mom was a very smart and progressive lady!
Over the years she stayed in touch with her family and as the youngest child, was very close to her mother. Her father, according to her, was an alcoholic and frequently left home for extended periods. She spoke very little about him. During high school, she was captain of the women's basketball team and very athletic. Mom worked in a tea room during college to help support herself.
Mom had few faults, she did not smoke or drink and in many ways was naive about those who did. She could however, hold a grudge nearly forever. She was very close to her sister, Lillian ('Dot'), and there were many years strung together, that they did not communicate except through the Bond Family Circle letter, when one or the other would get upset about something. After the divorce of her son Darrel and his first wife, relations with her two grandchildren ceased. She never saw them again. Basically, however, she was a very loving and physically touching person. I never remember a time that when she was standing near me, that she wouldn't be rubbing on my back. In later years, when I was the only one at home, we would talk a lot and about anything. We were very close, as I was with my father, even when they were having marital feuds. Thanks to my mother, I was raised to be independent and think for myself. Dad certainly had his input, but during my informative years, he was on the road during the week and Mom kept the family going, just like her mother did. I believe Mom was always proud of that.
It was love at first sight when she met Dad. And although she refused to subjugate herself to him, she supported and loved him in every way she could.
Leaving Kansas and her family must have been tough for her, when Dad packed up the family and headed to California to work in the aircraft industry with Aunt Dot's husband, Uncle Fat. At least having her favorite sister nearby must have helped.
I always found it interesting, that as a Christian Scientist, Mom worked as a buyer in drug stores. She was really good at it too, winning all kind of awards for selling vitamins, when she wouldn't take one herself. All the family took them, but not her. To get her to see a doctor was nearly impossible. After she developed high blood pressure, her feelings about doctors and medications seemed to change. Come to think of it, that was about the time she became a Baptist.
She was a very quiet person, but enjoyed people. Our house was always filled with friends. My high school friends always stopped by to see my folks, even after I left home. Mom helped a lot of my friends through one crises or another, she was easy to talk to and stayed current with the world. Her one 'vice' was movie magazines. We always had piles of them around the house and she devoured them from cover to cover.
As a housekeeper, she was not queen. Dad did most of the caring of things domestic, although she was an excellent cook. But, then again, so was Dad. She had a 'Kleenex' with her at all times and left them laying around everywhere, even amongst her movie magazines.
One time Dad had moved to Idaho to help promote a new company and she would not move with him. However, after her retirement, she finally did and she told me it was the happiest year of her life.
After Dad's passing, Mom had quite a time coming to grips with it. It took her several years before she really began living again. She joined Tops, the weight watching group, and made a lot of new friends, joined a new church and even made a trip to Hawaii. She visited us in Alabama several time and her trips were always enjoyable. During one of her visits, she told me of a paranormal experience she had a while after Dad's death. She said that she woke up in the middle of the night and saw Dad standing at the foot of the bed. She said that he told her to 'Let me go'...it was after that that she got on with her life. She was a 'home body' and Dad loved the open road and things new. However, after Dad's passing, she seemed to embrace Dad's life style, visiting our scattered family when ever she could, meeting new friends and working in her church. Her trip to Hawaii was a pleasant surprise to all of us. In fact it was during one of her trips to Alabama after visiting the family and was planning on attending her 50th High School reunion in Kansas, that she passed away...quietly, during her sleep with the sweetest smile on her face, like she was again joining up with Dad. It was one of the most traumatic events of my life, but eventually gave way to all the really warm and wonderful memories and feelings of my time with her. She is constantly missed in my life.
 
Bond, Laura Louisa (I042)
 
240 Passed at sunrise of scottsdale about 5:10 pm Campbell, Ruth (I159617)
 
241 Rose Hills Memorial Park Fishel, Clinton E (I161876)
 
242 Rupp Cemetery Alexander, Mary (I181434)
 
243 Social Security Administration. <i>Social Security Death Index, Master File</i>. Social Security Administration. Source (S2617568259)
 
244 Some say Henry born in Wash. Co, PA,if so then technically Bedford Co,PA, because it split off in 1773 to form Westmoreland Co, PA, which then lost land to form Washington Co,PA in 1781; More likely born back east, unless they routed by Indians-CAL Holman, Henry (I164509)
 
245 State of California. <i>California Birth Index, 1905-1995</i>. Sacramento, CA, USA: State of California Department of Health Services, Center for Health Statistics. Source (S2617566882)
 
246 Sylvan Heights Cemetary Shepler, Fannie E (I187811)
 
247 This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created. Source (S2617566866)
 
248 Voter Registration Lists, Public Record Filings, Historical Residential Records, and Other Household Database Listings Source (S2617568887)
 
249 Voter Registration Lists, Public Record Filings, Historical Residential Records, and Other Household Database Listings Source (S2617568888)
 
250 Was hit by a train near Libertyville Hughell, Donald Leroy (I162461)
 

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